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Bird Superstitions 1
Posted In: Information and Theories  9/18/09
By: Yona Williams

birdsuperstitions.jpg
From the mysteriousness of owls to finding good luck in an unfortunate feathered mishap, a great deal of animal superstitions involves birds. In this article, you will learn what actions bring good luck and which ones you should avoid like the plague.

Usually, we try our best to avoid the messes that birds make, but around the world (including in Ireland), there is a belief that if a bird "goes to bathroom" on your car, it is good luck. Others believe that the bird droppings must land on your head before it is considered good luck. Additional superstitions associated with birds in general include:

·    If a bird flies into your home, you should expect an important message to arrive soon.

·    A white bird is seen in some circles as a symbol of impending death.

·    When it comes to bird calls, direction matters. A call from the north signifies tragedy, while one from the south means to expect good crops. A call from the west means you will encounter good luck, while one from the east involves positive happenings in the love department.

Other bird superstitions linked to specific species include:

Sparrows
Since some people believe that sparrows carry the souls of the dead, killing one could bring you bad luck.

Owls
For centuries, owls have been the subject of a handful of superstitions and beliefs. For instance, during ancient Greek days, the owls were respected for their wise and kind nature. Because of this, they were often seen as a sacred creature to Athena – the goddess of wisdom and learning.

In some cultures, the hoot of an owl brought fear to those who heard it because they believed the sound had the power to bring bad luck. It was a custom to place irons in your fire to counteract the influence of an owl. Other approaches involving adding salt, hot peppers or vinegar to a fire in hopes that the creature would get a sore tongue – making it unable to hoot.

According to an old wives tale, feed roasted owl to a man and he is said to become obedient to his wife or significant other.

Peacocks
The tail of a peacock produces some of the most beautiful feathers, but did you know that the peacock feather is decorating with an 'evil eye' at the end. In a Greek legend, Argus – the monster with 100 eyes was turned into a peacock with all of its eyes being placed on his tail.

Ravens
Edgar Allen Poe based a famous poem regarding these sleek, black birds. There is a superstition that states the spirit of King Arthur is found in a raven, which is the form he chooses when visiting the world. It is considered bad luck to kill a raven.

Robins
If you make a wish on the very first robin that you see during the spring season, it is said to come true. Robins have also been seen as a sign of death in the family if it should enter a home. There have been reported instances where the bird entered a home the day before, the day of, and the day after the death of a family member.


 

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