Unexplainable.Net

Ancient Rome: The Female Gladiator Part II

Normal
0

;
mso-font-charset:128;
mso-generic-font-family:swiss;
mso-font-format:other;
mso-font-pitch:variable;
mso-font-signature:1 134676480 16 0 131072 0;}
@font-face
{font-family:”@Arial Unicode MS”;
panose-1:0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0;
mso-font-charset:128;
mso-generic-font-family:swiss;
mso-font-format:other;
mso-font-pitch:variable;
mso-font-signature:1 134676480 16 0 131072 0;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
{mso-style-update:auto;
mso-style-parent:””;
margin:0in;
margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
color:black;}
h1
{mso-style-update:auto;
margin-right:0in;
mso-margin-top-alt:auto;
mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
margin-left:0in;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
mso-outline-level:1;
font-size:11.0pt;
mso-bidi-font-size:24.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Arial Unicode MS”;
mso-font-kerning:18.0pt;
font-weight:normal;
mso-bidi-font-weight:bold;}
h2
{margin-right:0in;
mso-margin-top-alt:auto;
mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
margin-left:0in;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
mso-outline-level:2;
font-size:18.0pt;
font-family:”Arial Unicode MS”;
font-weight:bold;}
h3
{mso-style-update:auto;
margin-right:0in;
mso-margin-top-alt:auto;
mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
margin-left:0in;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
mso-outline-level:3;
font-size:11.0pt;
mso-bidi-font-size:13.5pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Arial Unicode MS”;
font-weight:normal;
mso-bidi-font-weight:bold;}
h4
{margin-right:0in;
mso-margin-top-alt:auto;
mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
margin-left:0in;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
mso-outline-level:4;
font-size:11.0pt;
mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Arial Unicode MS”;
font-weight:normal;
mso-bidi-font-weight:bold;}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
{color:blue;
text-decoration:underline;
text-underline:single;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
{color:purple;
text-decoration:underline;
text-underline:single;}
p
{mso-style-update:auto;
margin-right:0in;
mso-margin-top-alt:auto;
mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
margin-left:0in;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Arial Unicode MS”;}
span.mw-headline
{mso-style-name:mw-headline;}
span.editsection
{mso-style-name:editsection;}
@page Section1
{size:8.5in 11.0in;
margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;
mso-header-margin:.5in;
mso-footer-margin:.5in;
mso-paper-source:0;}
div.Section1
{page:Section1;}
–>
Continuing the exploration of female gladiators, you’re probably wondering if any skeletal remains have been found that point to their existence. In this article, you will learn of the location where a collection of bones thought to belong to a former gladiator has been uncovered.

Gladiator Schooling for Women

A Roman historian specializing in sociology of this culture believes that the schools that taught men to become gladiators were not appropriate for women to frequent. It is believed that they instead studied with a private tutor. While these schools were set aside for training high-ranking males over 14 years of age in martial arts. Interestingly, there have been three references regarding the training of women. It was even stated that one of the women had died. An inscription was found that read: “To the divine shades of Valeria Iucunda, who belonged to the body of the iuvenes. She lived 17 years, 9 months.”

The Female Gladiator in London?

Artifacts and remains associated with female gladiators have been uncovered in Southwark, London. In 2001, a skeleton of a female Roman was identified as a former gladiator. She was a wealthy woman, but yet, she was laid to rest as an outcast. Her grave was located outside of the main cemetery. However, pottery lamps of Anubis and other artifacts with the image of a fallen gladiator had been found in the grave. Burnt pinecones from a tree that was traditionally burnt during gladiator games was also found in the bowls placed in her grave.

However, not everyone is convinced. Many experts believe the remains have been incorrectly identified and that only circumstantial evidence points to the background of the remains. The Museum of London stands by the thought that what has become known as the “Great Dover Street Woman” was a gladiator. Today, the skeleton is on display at the Museum of London and had appeared in a program investigating the topic.

Other Evidence of Female Gladiators

During the Flavian and Trajanic eras, female gladiators faced a strong criticism against their participation in the arena games. Mentioned in the Satire VI of Juvenal, the female gladiators were looked down upon because they usually came from upper-class families. It was assumed that these kinds of women were only looking for a thrill and wanted to become the center of attention.

The gladiatrices associated with Emperor Domitian (the 11th Roman Emperor) was mentioned in the writings of Suetonius, Statius, and Martial.

Around 200 AD, Septimius Severus (who was known as the last imperial dynasty of the Roman principate , right before the Crisis of the Third Century took place) banned female gladiators. However, a later inscription found at Ostia had an advertisement that highlighted women competing. They were called ‘mulieres.’ It can be assumed that the ban was ignored.