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Magnetic Fields Affect Our Brain and Thoughts

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Alterations in Imaginings and Suggestibility During Brief Magnetic Field Exposures

by Christine F. DeSano and M. A. Persinger

Geophysical Variables and Behaviour: XXXIX

Alterations in Imaginings and Suggestibility During Brief Magnetic Field Exposures

by Christine F. DeSano and M. A. Persinger at Laurentian University

originally in Perceptual Motor Skills, 1987

Male and female subjects were exposed to alternating magnetic fields of 1 and 4 Hertz which were applied across their mid-superior Temporal lobes.

In addition, a green light was pulsed in phase with the magnetic field while the participant was instructed to imagine an encounter with an alien.

Rostral (at nose level) to the upper half of the ear, retractable arms were placed, each containing a 25 CM (1 CM diameter) soft iron nail wrapped (1050 turns) with insulated wire (20 gauge).

A function generator was used to drive the solenoids with sine wave current at either 1 HZ or 4 HZ.

Magnetic field intensity was about 15 GAUSS at the skull surface.

Field strength measured at the temporal cortex was 2 GAUSS.

Maximum field strength as measured at the level of the frontal lobes was 200 MGAUSS (a 10 factor decrease).

At the level of the hippocampus, field strength was 500 MGAUSS.

All subjects generated elaborate imaginings when exposed to a green light flashing in sync with the driven solenoids.

4 HZ field imaginings included a sensation of rising or floating.

The end result of the experiment was that hypnotic susceptibility may be increased following magnetic-field exposure but that the most effective frequency is different for each sex.

The quantity of imagery generated (particular the floating sensations) INCREASED if the person observed a light flashing in sync with a 4 HZ applied magnetic field.

Most interesting of all was that the magnetic field strengths were MUCH LESS than those expected to occur in NATURAL SETTINGS.