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1954 JANAP 146(C)- How To Report UFOs

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JANAP 146(C)

THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF JOINT COMMUNICATIONS-ELECTRONICS COMMITTEE
WASHINGTON, D. C.

10 MARCH 1954

LETTER OF PROMULGATION

1. JANAP 146(C) COMMUNICATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR REPORTING VITAL INTELLIGENCE
SIGHTINGS FROM AIRBORNE AND WATERBORNE SOURCES, is an unclassified publication.

2. JANAP 146(C) COMMUNICATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR REPORTING VITAL INTELLIGENCE
SIGHTINGS FROM AIRBORNE AND WATERBORNE SOURCES, is effective upon receipt and
supersedes JANAP 146 (B), COMMUNICATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR REPORTING VITAL
INTELLIGENCE SIGHTINGS FROM AIRCRAFT (CIRVIS) and all other conflicting
instructions. JANAP 146(B) shall be destroyed by burning. No report of
destruction is required.

CHAPTER II

CIRVIS REPORTS

SECTION I – GENERAL

201. INFORMATION TO BE REPORTED AND WHEN TO REPORT a. Sightings within the
scope of this chapter, as outlined in Article 102b(l), (2), and (3), are to be
reported as follows:

(l) While airborne (except over foreign territory – See Article 212).

(a) Single aircraft or formations of aircraft which appear to be directed
against the United States, its territories or possessions.

(b) Missiles.

? Unidentified flying objects.

(d) Submarines.

(e) A group or groups of military surface vessels.

(2) Upon Landing.

(a) Individual surface vessels, submarines, or aircraft of unconventional
design, or engaged in suspicious activity or observed in an unusual location or
following an unusual course.

(b) Confirmation reports.

202. SIGHTINGS NOT TO BE REPORTED

Reports are not desired concerning surface craft or aircraft in normal
passage, or known U.S. military or government vessels and aircraft.

________________________________

JANAP 146(E)

CHAPTER II

CIRVIS REPORTS

SECTION I – GENERAL

201. Information to be Reported and When to Report.

a. Sightings within the scope of this chapter, as outlined in paragraphs
102b(1), (2), (6) and (7), are to be reported as follows:

(1) While airborne and from land based observers.

(a) Hostile or unidentified single aircraft or formations of aircraft which
appear to be directed against the United States or Canada or their forces.

(b) Missiles.

? Unidentified flying objects.

(d) Hostile or unidentified submarines.

(e) Hostile or unidentified group or groups of military surface vessels.

(f) Individual surface vessels, submarines, or aircraft of unconventional
design, or engaged in suspicious activity or observed in a location or on a
course which may be interpreted as constituting a threat to the United States,
Canada or their forces.

(g) Any unexplained or unusual activity which may indicate a possible attach
against or through Canada or the United States, including the presence of any
unidentified or other suspicious ground parties in the Polar Region or other
remote or sparsely populated areas.

(2) Upon landing.

(a) Reports which for any reason could not be transmitted while airborne.

(b) Unlisted airfields or facilities, weather stations, or air navigation
aids.

? Post landing reports (to include photographs or film if pictures were
taken; see paragraph 104).

204. Contents of CIRVIS Reports.

2-1 ORIGINAL

____________________________

JANAP 146(C)

CHAPTER III

MERINT REPORTS

SECTION I – GENERAL

301. INFORMATION TO BE REPORTED AND WHEN TO REPORT

a. Sightings within the scope of this chapter (as outlined in Article 102b.,
(4), (5), (6), (7) are to be reported as follows:

(l) Immediately (except when within territorial waters of other nations as
prescribed by international law)

a) Guided Missiles

b) Unidentified flying objects

c) Submarines

d) Group or groups of military vessels

e) Formation of aircraft (which appear to be directed against the United
States, its territories or possessions).

f) Individual surface vessels, submarines, or aircraft of unconventional
design, or engaged in suspicious activity or observed in an unusual location or
following an unusual course.

(2) When situation changes sufficiently to warrant an amplifying report (see
Art. 409).

SECTION III – SECURITY

308. MILITARY AND CIVILIAN

a& All persons aware of the contents or existence of a MERINT report are
governed by the Commincations Act of 1934 and amendments thereto, and Espionage
Laws. MERINT reports contain information affect ing the National Defense of the
United States within the meaning of the Espionage Laws, 18 U.S. Code, 793 and
794. The unauthorized transmission or revelation of the contents of MERINT
reports in any manner is pro hibited.

b. Military commands and activities in making local distribution of MERINT
reports and in subsequent communications regarding the contents of any MERINT
report shall handle such communications in accordance with current security
regulations.

402. EXAMPLES BY TYPE

The following are examples of the types of “MERINT” reports.

Specific application of Military or commercial procedure has been avoided
since the means of transmission would determine the procedure to be used.

Of primary importance is the expeditious handling and accuracy of the
reports.

a. “MERINT” REPORT

(1) A radiotelegraph transmission:

RAPID US GOVT

TO

COMEASTSEAFRON 90 CHURCH ST. NEW YORK

MERINT 5126 N 14230W 3 UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS HEADED NW AT 17000 FEET
CIGAR SHAPE 50 FEET TO SW AT 2 MILES VERIFIED BY NAVIGATOR VISIBILITY UNLIMITED
211513Z JONES NKLN